Oh, my guuurd! Me too!
Inspiration

Oh, my guuurd! Me too!

Well, it looks like today…

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Chevy Chase is my Father
Entertainment

Chevy Chase is my Father

The Sunday afternoons of my…

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Keeping My Sanity
Self-Care

Keeping My Sanity

Inevitably, you’ll hear us talk…

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Do you have a floor?
Self-Care

Do you have a floor?

How Addressing my Internal Messiness…

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Well, it looks like today is the day. The blog is officially launching, I’m headed on a coffee tour in Kingston, and I may or may not be losing my mind with excitement. For you, the one reading this, it may be no big deal. So, what. A few people are going to throw up some articles on the interwebs and when and if you feel like it, you’ll read them. Yippee. But for us, me especially, it’s a big deal. I have always found great comfort in the relatable. The “Oh, my guuurd! Me too!” moments we have with friends, relatives, even strangers. It’s nice to know that the things we are feeling or going through others are experiencing too. Maybe you’re a mom who’s had a really rough day with the kids. Perhaps you’re struggling with your career, and you’re unsure that the road you have taken is…

The Sunday afternoons of my childhood were spent puking into plastic bags in backseat of a station wagon. Picture something quite similar to a scene right out one of the Family Vacation movies. But with puking. Lots and lots of puke. So. Much. … Okay, I think you get the picture. Did I mention how much fun it was? Sing-a-longs, bags of cheese curds, pulling over every 30 kilometres to take in the sights, sounds and smells. Hiking up Whiteface Mountain, crossing the border to watch large ocean liners trudge through the nearby locks at sunset or searching for frogs and snakes at good old Loch Garry. No adventure was ever too big or small for my parents. For they knew (or it just struck me that perhaps they absolutely never even considered it) they were igniting this insatiable desire for adventure in all of their three children. The same…

How Addressing my Internal Messiness set me on the Road to External Organization Growing up, I had a messy room – Clothes piled high in my closet; papers were strewn about the floor. This, understandably, drove my mother nuts! But I had a full schedule of instant-messaging friends, skipping class and counting down days until graduation. Tidiness was a silly something reserved for cranky parents. Yes, freak-outs occurred when I couldn’t find my prized Abercrombie jeans (which, admittedly, was often) but cleaning my room was not on the menu. Looking back, my road to external organization actually began with addressing my internal messiness. Although my childhood room was a disaster, parental overhead and high school provided enough structure for young me to “keep it together.” Things took a distinct turn, however, post-graduation. While studying acting in NY, it became achingly clear that I was unqualified to care for myself. Think Black Swan. By the time my…

Inevitably, you’ll hear us talk about self-care at connexionista.com. And for many of us, that mostly means taking time out of jam-packed schedules for personal development, engaging in projects that speak to us outside of work and visits to the spa for downtime. Personally, while all that other stuff applies, self-care mostly means paying other people to do the stuff I don’t have time for or simply hate doing. This is not a new concept to me, paying people for tasks. I first realized how important the idea was 9 years ago when I read the book Smart Women Finish Rich – Canadian Edition by David Bach. In it, he asks why we as women, presumably skilled and educated in a particular industry, spend much of our time on menial tasks not related whatsoever to our chosen profession. Tasks like house cleaning, or lawn maintenance. He proposed instead, that we spend more…

Chances are good, your kid goes to school with a child with some type of disability or special need. If you’re not specifically familiar with their disability, the thought of planning a playdate or inviting them to a birthday party may seem a bit overwhelming or even frightening. You may think, it’s not worth the effort, and don’t bother. As a special needs parent, let me reassure you in the strongest way possible, we want the invitation. We want nothing more for our children to not just be “integrated” into regular classrooms, but to be included and accepted by their peers. We want them to experience typical childhood joys like other children so very badly. Invite us, we will go out of our way to move mountains to make it work. Here are some things you can do. 1. Send an email or DM with the invitation, or a note…